Security

ROOTCON13 CTF – Reverse Engineering – W4RMUP

ROOTCON13 CTF – Reverse Engineering – W4RMUP

Capture The Flag, Security
It’s the time of the year when ROOTCON, the largest security conference in the Philippines, is back in action. This was my 2nd time attending the conference and my 2nd time joining ROOTCON’s Capture the Flag event. Last year’s CTF was a close game since AJ, Ameer, and I placed 2nd from the overall score but we were able to pull off the 1st place this year against other strong teams including our hackstreetboys teammates Ariz, Felix, and Jym from [hsb]JumboHackdog, and IJ from DiKoPoAlam. It was honestly a challenging game thanks to the awesome guys from Pwn De Manila. Since AJ and Ameer did the web (nearly a board wipe!) which can be seen here, I was doing other categories and gonna share this reverse engineering challenge that I managed to solve during the event. This
The Potential of Finding Privilege Escalation Vulnerabilities Through CWE-347

The Potential of Finding Privilege Escalation Vulnerabilities Through CWE-347

Security, Vulnerabilities
I found the concept of privilege escalation attacks quite interesting because in theory, it's easy to understand the goal but it actually requires creativity to execute or even discover. While doing research, I came across CWE-347 that was assigned to "Improper Verification of Cryptographic Signature". Its description follows as "The software does not verify, or incorrectly verifies, the cryptographic signature for data". Having a thought about this, if we talk about verifying cryptographic signature for data, we point out the integrity of the data involved or simply, "is the data tampered or not?" If you've seen the example code given in the CWE-347 page, you'll notice that the verification of the cryptographic signature of data can be in the form of checking if a downloaded file w...
Exploiting Programs That Keep Storing Sensitive Information in Memory

Exploiting Programs That Keep Storing Sensitive Information in Memory

Security, Vulnerabilities
Introduction While studying for Offensive Security's Cracking the Perimeter last 2018, I encountered proof of concept exploits relating to recovery of sensitive information from memory. A popular tool that actually does this in Windows is mimikatz however, this article will be presenting more about vulnerabilities on 3rd party applications instead of the one intended for what mimikatz targets. This type of vulnerability is described more through CWE-316: Cleartext Storage of Sensitive Information in Memory and you'll actually be surprised that a lot of applications are still vulnerable to this type of issue. Looking more into the vulnerability Before I even bothered to discover the same type of vulnerability from other applications, I tried to check out what programs were already disc...
Offensive Security Certified Expert (OSCE) Experience

Offensive Security Certified Expert (OSCE) Experience

Penetration Testing, Security
Offensive Security's CTP (Cracking the Perimeter) is a more advanced training for penetration testing leading to Offensive Security Certified Expert if the 48-hour exam is cleared. The course is basically offered similarly to how Penetration Testing with Kali leading to Offensive Security Certified Professional is set. The difference however is that the course for PWK gives a student access to a corporate network where one can work his/her way into getting into each machine through various techniques while CTP on the other hand concentrates more on discovering unknown vulnerabilities. To make the story short, PWK-OSCP's outcome is for a student being able to do practical penetration testing through methods starting from information gathering up to post exploitation while CTP-OSCE's ...
Hacking the Dutch Government – Responsible Disclosure

Hacking the Dutch Government – Responsible Disclosure

Security, Vulnerabilities
... and all I got was a lousy t-shirt The Dutch Government "Rijksoverheid" has this responsible disclosure program where if you manage to find a vulnerability in one of their systems, they reward you with a shirt having a small logo of their National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) together with "I hacked the Dutch Government and all I got was this lousy t-shirt". Quite humorous eh? So visiting one of their websites I've managed to find a CHANGELOG.txt which is a file commonly left when an administrator installs and doesn't clean up. This CHANGLOG.txt basically shows critical information. Seeing that the current Drupal version installed is 7.43 (which is already outdated), one might think that this should be vulnerable to CVE-2018-7600 or "Drupalgeddon", a vulnerability that ...